Infant Who Begins Babies R Us Customer Satisfaction Survey Dies of Old Age

16 Jan
January 16, 2012

My Babies R Us Receipt

Ahh, Customer Satisfaction Suveys. I periodically take customer satisfaction web and phone surveys when they show up on receipts.  I noticed that Babies R Us has one.  Since I was in the store on Saturday, January 7th, I decided to take the survey.  I noticed that I only had until the 9th to complete.  The prize for my time?  A chance to win $500! (Their exclamation point, not mine.)

Anywho, the survey was lengthy…to say the least.  45 plus questions?  And more questions populated depending on how I answered.  I was half tempted to change my answers just to get rid of the auto populated questions. I am sure I am not the only one.  As I state in another blog post, how many busy parents have time to complete the survey?

Another issue I had was the cashier ID.  3rd spot on the demo receipt, but not on mine.  Next, was just the sheer length.  That progress bar at the top let me know just how far from the end I was.  If I wouldn’t have been recording taking the survey, I would have quit.  Frankly, it took so long to take the survey that I ran out of time on my screen recording system (I still love ya Screenr!)

Finally, it seemed that many of the questions were duplicated-was I satisfied with X, then was I satisfied with X on a scale of 0-10.  I realize they wanted to get a Net Promoter Score for each question, but it would have been easier to ask me each question once, rather than twice.  Oh well. You can watch me rant about my experience with a portion of the darn survey below.  What I want to know is if anyone actually reviews responses, and if anyone will get in touch with me about my survey.  I also want to know if anyone else would have completed this survey…

Update:  1 week later-no response from Babies R Us.  No infants were harmed during the taking of this survey.

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The Service Witch roams around with hidden cameras, and captures the good, bad and ugly of customer service. Then she discusses it. She also has minions out there doing the same thing. All over. You never know what they will catch. (@theservicewitch, @measurecp)

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21 replies
  1. Kiran says:

    What a great way to capture the agony that is involved in completed a survey like this. It is quite possible that the survey taker could very well be a parent who is short on sleep and time and want to get through this exercise as fast as they can. Making users to go through that many questions without a real incentive is a total disservice. Thanks for your time.

    Reply
  2. David says:

    People don’t uniformly respond to the surveys. . For example, I always fill out any survey about hotels and airlines, because I enjoy traveling and feel that it might help improve service.

    But for stores and shopping I can’t be bothered. I stared in bewilderment at one survey that gave an estimate of a half an hour to complete. … longer than I was in the store to buy a product!

    I think most people are creeped out by the performance review surveys, everytime I buy something in a store and the salesperson has to circle the website and their personal id number on the receipt and ask me to survey them, I feel horrible for them..

    I stopped doing store surveys after I answered a survey candidly from Macy’s about their midnight-shopping Thanksgiving evening, and had the store manager playing telephone tag with me for days to apologize…

    I remember a telephone survey about aspirin where both the surveyor and I realized we were caught in a trap we could not escape from, her voice grew sadder as the questions continued and the minutes ticked by..

    That was toward the end of the telephone survey era, and I think these long surveys will suffer the same fate.

    How far are we away from “person-review” websites where for a fee you can look anybody up and see their performance reviews on their jobs….like a credit rating..

    Reply
    • ServiceWitch says:

      David
      Would love to see that half hour survey. That slays me every time. It takes me longer to complete your survey than it did for me to get in, make my purchase, and get out the door of your brand. And giving me your name and telling me that if I was happy, to let them know on the customer satisfaction survey? It makes me feel like either the brand bases raises and bonuses off this, or the employees are flogged weekly if they aren’t given a positive review by some customer.

      These surveys are now combinations of customer satisfaction, marketing studies, marketing research, employee research…and ask far too many detailed questions for the customer to accurately remember.

      Reply
  3. Steve Stevens says:

    Aren’t these surveys optional? You don’t have to answer it! And did you know you can enter the sweepstakes without filling out the survey?

    Reply
    • ServiceWitch says:

      Steve,
      They are optional. However, the real discussion is around the responsibility that market research firms have to their clients to create quality surveys, not lengthy surveys.

      Reply
  4. Customer Thermometer says:

    Fabulous article. It astounds us how many companies want to put customers, people they are supposed to value above all else, through such a painful exercise.

    What’s even worse than the pointlessness of the questions being asked is the fact that the majority of these surveys don’t tie feedback to individuals – making the exercise even less actionable. Assessing customer satisfaction shouldn’t be a market research exercise! It simply doesn’t make sense to ask valued customers for their feedback and then make the results anonymous so that you can’t tell who said what.

    One of your commenters makes a great point about spending longer filling in a survey than visiting a store. Utlimately, would-be surveyers need to make the choice between lots of non-actionable information and some truly actionable (but less detailed) insight. We sell a and we’re getting a lot of new customers – for exactly the reasons you outline in your post. Long surveys aren’t a panacea – and perhaps it’s time for a differenct way of looking for customer feedback; one which respects the customers’ time.

    Reply
  5. Brien Connor says:

    I work at a Babies R Us store and just wanted to let you know that, response or not, the surveys are read, at least by someone. Every time I have an opening shift I have to attend our morning meeting, where the manager reads negative comments about our store and staff and lists the poor numbers we received on the surveys. They almost never read positive comments or numbers – I don’t know if this is because we don’t receive them (unhappy customers are more likely to fill out the survey, after all) or if they are ignored or what, but it sure is a horrible way to start the day!

    Reply
  6. YRESEARCH says:

    I believe that you misunderstand NPS, which is to capture the “likelihood to recommend” of customers. Though the questions are all 10-point scale questions, that does not mean they are all be able to translated to NPS. That being said, I agree with what you said – this survey is just too lengthy!

    Reply

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